Add users to already created databases in your Siteworx account.

At Hosting Made Easy we offer all users access to Mysql relational databases, these are commonly used with CMS systems like WordPress, Drupal etc. as well as E-commerce platforms.

The guide below will walk you through how to add users to databases in Siteworx.

1. You can login to your Siteworx account from either your client WHMCS portal or direct via the Siteworx URL.

Login with your email address and password provided when you signed up for your account.

WHMCS login:

https://hosting-made-easy.co.uk/billing/index.php?rp=/login

Enterprise Cloud Platform - User Login Page

 

Siteworx URL:

https://yourdomain.com:2443/siteworx

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Siteworx Login Page

2. Once logged in, scroll down to the MYSQL section.

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

3. Click on the 'Databases' icon. 

4. Click on the dark user icon to add a user to this database.

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

5. Once the User field is completed from the drop down menu, and the users permissions have been set, click on the purple button ‘Add'

Other database guides you might find useful:

Create database in Siteworx

Add users to databases in Siteworx

Create users to already created databases in your Siteworx account.

At Hosting Made Easy we offer all users access to Mysql relational databases, these are commonly used with CMS systems like WordPress, Drupal etc. as well as E-commerce platforms.

The guide below will walk you through how to create database users in Siteworx.

1. You can login to your Siteworx account from either your client WHMCS portal or direct via the Siteworx URL.

Login with your email address and password provided when you signed up for your account.

WHMCS login:

https://hosting-made-easy.co.uk/billing/index.php?rp=/login

Enterprise Cloud Platform - User Login Page

Siteworx URL:

https://yourdomain.com:2443/siteworx

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Siteworx Login Page

2. Once logged in, scroll down to the MYSQL section.

3. Click on the 'Users' icon. 

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

4. Click on the purple button with a plus sign on it.

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

5. Complete the required details, Database Name.

6. Once the Username and Password fields are complete, click on the purple button ‘Add’

7. You can use the purple button with a wand on to auto generate passwords if required.

8. You can create more users if required by using the same process as above.

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

9. If you need to delete a user, click on the dark trash can.

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

Other database guides you might find useful:

Create database in Siteworx

Add users to database in Siteworx

Create databases in your Siteworx account.

At Hosting Made Easy we offer all users access to Mysql relational databases, these are commonly used with CMS systems like WordPress, Drupal etc. as well as E-commerce platforms.

The guide below will walk you through how to create databases in Siteworx.

1. You can login to your Siteworx account from either your client WHMCS portal or direct via the Siteworx URL.

Login with your email address and password provided when you signed up for your account.

WHMCS login:

https://hosting-made-easy.co.uk/billing/index.php?rp=/login

Enterprise Cloud Platform - User Login Page

 

 

Siteworx URL:

https://yourdomain.com:2443/siteworx

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Siteworx Login Page

 

2. Once logged in, scroll down to the MYSQL section.

3. Click on the 'Add an MySQL Database' icon. 

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

4. Complete the required details, Database Name.

5. Once the database field is complete, click on the purple button ‘Add’

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Create and Setup Users in Siteworx

6. You should now be able to see the database you have created.

7. You can create more databases if required by using the same process as above.

8. If you need to delete the database, click on the dark trash can.


Other database guides you might find useful:

Create database users in Siteworx

Add users to databases in Siteworx

Setup your FTP (file Transfer Protocol) to allow file uploads to your website.

In the web hosting environment FTP or File Transfer Protocol is a standard network protocol used for the transfer of computer files from client computer to web server.

FTP is built on a client-server model architecture using separate control and data connections between the client and the server.

1. You can login to your Siteworx account from either your client WHMCS portal or direct via the Siteworx URL.

Login with your email address and password provided when you signed up for your account.

WHMCS login:

https://hosting-made-easy.co.uk/billing/index.php?rp=/login


Siteworx URL:

https://yourdomain.com:2443/siteworx

2. Once logged in, scroll down to the FTP section.

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Siteworx FTP Setup

3. Click on the 'Add an FTP Account' icon. 

4. Complete the required details, FTP Username and Password.

5. You can use the purple button with a wand on to auto generate passwords if required.

6. Once all fields are complete, click on the purple button ‘Add’

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Siteworx FTP Setup

8. You can create more FTP users if required by using the same process as above.

9. If you need to edit the FTP user, you can click on the pencil icon and edit the user details.

10. If you need to delete the FTP user, click on the dark trash can.

Enterprise Cloud Platform - Siteworx FTP Setup

11. You just need to add your details into your chosen FTP client.

Username: demo@demo.hosting-made-easy.co.uk

Password: your password

Host: ftp.demo.hosting-made-easy.co.uk

FTP Port number: 21

Just change the demo@demo.hosting-made-easy.co.uk and demo@demo.hosting-made-easy.co.uk above for your domain name.

Monit System Monitoring is a system for automatic management and pro-active monitoring of Information Technology Systems. 

Main Features

We will be installing Monit onto a CentOS 7 linux server.

The current stable version of Monit is 5.26.0 via YUM.

We will only be using Monit for local monitoring and will not be using the Monit web interface.

1. First we need to install the EPEL repository and then install Monit.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo yum install epel-release -y

Resolving Dependencies

--> Running transaction check

---> Package epel-release.noarch 0:7-11 will be installed

--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

================================================================================

 Package                Arch             Version         Repository        Size

================================================================================

Installing:

 epel-release           noarch           7-11            extras            15 k

Transaction Summary

================================================================================

Install  1 Package

Total download size: 15 k

Installed size: 24 k

Downloading packages:

epel-release-7-11.noarch.rpm                               |  15 kB   00:00     

Running transaction check

Running transaction test

Transaction test succeeded

Running transaction

  Installing : epel-release-7-11.noarch                                     1/1 

  Verifying  : epel-release-7-11.noarch                                     1/1 

Installed:

  epel-release.noarch 0:7-11                                                    

Complete!

[hme@hme ~]# sudo yum install monit -y

Resolving Dependencies

--> Running transaction check

---> Package monit.x86_64 0:5.26.0-1.el7 will be installed

--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

=======================================================================================================================

 Package                   Arch                       Version                           Repository                Size

=======================================================================================================================

Installing:

 monit                     x86_64                     5.26.0-1.el7                      epel                     321 k

Transaction Summary

=======================================================================================================================

Install  1 Package

Total download size: 321 k

Installed size: 822 k

Downloading packages:

monit-5.26.0-1.el7.x86_64.rpm                                                                   | 321 kB  00:00:00     

Running transaction check

Running transaction test

Transaction test succeeded

Running transaction

  Installing : monit-5.26.0-1.el7.x86_64                                                                           1/1 

  Verifying  : monit-5.26.0-1.el7.x86_64                                                                           1/1 

Installed:

  monit.x86_64 0:5.26.0-1.el7                                                                                          

Complete!

2. We can run the monit -V command to confirm the Monit version installed.

[hme@hme ~]# monit -V

This is Monit version 5.26.0

Built with ssl, with ipv6, with compression, with pam and with large files

Copyright (C) 2001-2019 Tildeslash Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

3. We can start and enable Monit with the following commands.

hme@hme ~]# sudo systemctl enable monit

Created symlink from /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/monit.service to /usr/lib/systemd/system/monit.service.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo systemctl restart monit

[hme@hme ~]# sudo systemctl status monit

● monit.service - Pro-active monitoring utility for unix systems

   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/monit.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)

   Active: active (running) since Mon 2021-02-01 08:27:08 UTC; 3s ago

 Main PID: 26469 (monit)

   CGroup: /system.slice/monit.service

           └─26469 /usr/bin/monit -I

Feb 01 08:27:08 hme.hosting-made-easy.co.uk systemd[1]: Started Pro-active monitoring utility for unix systems.

Feb 01 08:27:08 hme.hosting-made-easy.co.uk monit[26469]: Starting Monit 5.26.0 daemon with http interface at [loca...2812

Feb 01 08:27:08 hme.hosting-made-easy.co.uk monit[26469]: 'hme.hosting-made-easy.co.uk' Monit 5.26.0 started

Feb 01 08:27:08 hme.hosting-made-easy.co.uk monit[26469]: 'hme.hosting-made-easy.co.uk' swap usage of 41.3% matches....0%]

Hint: Some lines were ellipsized, use -l to show in full.

4. We can check the Monit monitoring status with the following command.

From the screenshot below, we can see that Monit shows us the Status, Monitoring Status, Monitoring Mode, Load Average, CPU, Memory Usage, Swap Usage, Uptime, On-Reboot, Boot Time, and Data Collected.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit status

Monit 5.26.0 uptime: 0m

System 'hme.hosting-made-easy.co.uk'

  status                                  OK

  monitoring status            Monitored

  monitoring mode             active

  on reboot                            start

  load average                      [0.36] [0.14] [0.08]

  cpu                                       0.0%us 0.0%sy 0.0%wa

  memory usage                  248.1 MB [25.0%]

  swap usage                        211.3 MB [41.3%]

  uptime                                2d 12h 45m

  boot time                           Fri, 29 Jan 2021 19:54:10

  data collected                   Mon, 01 Feb 2021 08:39:51

5. We next need to configure Monit, the main config file location is /etc/monitrc

Bt default Monit checks the services every 30 seconds with set daemon 30, this can be changed to what every time period suits your application.

###############################################################################

## Global section

###############################################################################

##

## Start Monit in the background (run as a daemon):

#

set daemon  30              # check services at 30 seconds intervals

#   with start delay 240    # optional: delay the first check by 4-minutes (by

#                           # default Monit check immediately after Monit start)

#

#

6. We next need change the user and password, we don't have to as Monit is only running locally, but still good practice too.

If you would like to have access to Monit from outside of the server you would change the use address localhost to use address < your server ip >

set httpd port 2812 and

    use address localhost  # only accept connection from localhost (drop if you use M/Monit)

    allow localhost        # allow localhost to connect to the server and

    allow username:password      # require user 'admin' with password 'monit'

    #with ssl {            # enable SSL/TLS and set path to server certificate

    #    pemfile: /etc/ssl/certs/monit.pem

    #}

7. We next need to setup the email alerts to allow Monit to send emails out when we have server issues

## Monit by default uses the following format for alerts if the mail-format

statement is missing::

#

set mail-format {

from:    Monit <monit@$HOST>

subject: monit alert --  $EVENT $SERVICE

message: $EVENT Service $SERVICE

                 Date:        $DATE

                 Action:      $ACTION

                 Host:        $HOST

                 Description: $DESCRIPTION

            Your faithful employee,

            Monit

 }

##

#

set mailserver mail.example.com port 587                      # your email server

set mail-format { from: youremail@example.com }.      # email that will send all alerts

#

set alert youremail@example.com                                     # email that will receive all alerts

8. Once your Monit configuration files changes are complete, save and check your syntax with the following command.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit -t

Control file syntax OK

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit reload

Reinitializing monit daemon

9. We next need to setup the services to be monitored, these files are created and located in /etc/monit.d/

[hme@hme ~]# cd /etc/monit.d/

[hme@hme monit.d]# 

10. The first file we create is the system monitoring configuration

[hme@hme monit.d]# sudo nano system

check system host$

if memory > 80% for 2 cycles then exec alert else if succeeded then exec alert

if swap > 30% for 2 cycles then exec alert else if succeeded then exec alert

if cpu > 80% for 2 cycles then exec alert else if succeeded then exec "alert

if loadavg (5min) > 3 for 2 cycles then exec alert else if succeeded then alert

11. The second file we create is the web server monitoring configuration

[hme@hme monit.d]# sudo nano apache

check process httpd with pidfile /var/run/httpd/httpd.pid

  start program "/usr/bin/systemctl start httpd.service" with timeout 15 seconds

  stop program "/usr/bin/systemctl stop httpd.service"

  if failed port 443 then restart

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit -t

Control file syntax OK

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit reload

Reinitializing monit daemon

12. The third file we create is the PHP-FPM monitoring configuration

[hme@hme monit.d]# sudo nano php-fpm

check process php-fpm with pidfile /var/run/php-fpm/php-fpm.pid

  group phpcgi

  start program = "/usr/sbin/service php-fpm start" with timeout 15 seconds

  stop program  = "/usr/sbin/service php-fpm stop"

  if failed unixsocket /var/run/php-fpm-www.conf.sock then restart

  if 3 restarts within 5 cycles then timeout

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit -t

Control file syntax OK

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit reload

Reinitializing monit daemon

13. The fourth file we create is the MariaDB monitoring configuration

[hme@hme monit.d]# sudo nano mariadb

check process mariadb with pidfile /var/run/mariadb/mariadb.pid

    start program = "/usr/bin/systemctl start mariadb"

    stop program  = "/usr/bin/systemctl stop mariadb"

        if failed host 127.0.0.1 port 3306 then restart

        if failed host 127.0.0.1 port 3306 then exec alert else if succeeded then exec alert

        if 5 restarts within 5 cycles then timeout

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit -t

Control file syntax OK

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit reload

Reinitializing monit daemon

14. Once your Monit configuration files changes are complete, save and check your syntax with the following command.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit -t

Control file syntax OK

[hme@hme ~]# sudo monit reload

Reinitializing monit daemon

And that’s the basics of getting Monit System Monitoring up and running on your CentOS 7 server. 

Monit website

Monit Git Repository

AIDE (Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment, [eyd]) is a file and directory integrity checker.

AIDE is one of the most popular tools for monitoring the server changes in a LINUX based system.

Aide creates a database from the regular expression rules that it finds from the config file(s). Once this database is initialized it can be used to verify the integrity of the files. It has several message digest algorithms that are used to check the integrity of the file. All of the usual file attributes can also be checked for inconsistencies. It can read databases from older or newer versions. 

Main Features

We will be installing AIDE On CentOS 7 linux server.

The current stable version of AIDE is 0.15.1 via YUM

1. We will be using the YUM package manager to install AIDE.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo yum install aide -y

Resolving Dependencies

--> Running transaction check

---> Package aide.x86_64 0:0.15.1-13.el7 will be installed

--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

=====================================================================================================================================================================

 Package                             Arch                                  Version                                         Repository                           Size

=====================================================================================================================================================================

Installing:

 aide                                x86_64                                0.15.1-13.el7                                   base                                133 k

Transaction Summary

=====================================================================================================================================================================

Install  1 Package

Total download size: 133 k

Installed size: 311 k

Downloading packages:

aide-0.15.1-13.el7.x86_64.rpm                                                                                                                 | 133 kB  00:00:00     

Running transaction check

Running transaction test

Transaction test succeeded

Running transaction

  Installing : aide-0.15.1-13.el7.x86_64                                                                                                                         1/1 

  Verifying  : aide-0.15.1-13.el7.x86_64                                                                                                                         1/1 

Installed:

  aide.x86_64 0:0.15.1-13.el7                                                                                                                                        

Complete!

2. We can run the aide -v command to confirm the AIDE version and locate the configuration file.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo aide -v

Aide 0.15.1

Compiled with the following options:

WITH_MMAP

WITH_POSIX_ACL

WITH_SELINUX

WITH_PRELINK

WITH_XATTR

WITH_E2FSATTRS

WITH_LSTAT64

WITH_READDIR64

WITH_ZLIB

WITH_GCRYPT

WITH_AUDIT

CONFIG_FILE = "/etc/aide.conf"

3. We next need to create the database of our files and directory structure for AIDE to check against when it is run.

[hme@hme ~]# sudo aide --init

AIDE, version 0.15.1

### AIDE database at /var/lib/aide/aide.db.new.gz initialized.

4. We run the mv /var/lib/aide/aide.db.new.gz /var/lib/aide/aide.db.gz command to rename the new database to aide.db.gz. 

[hme@hme ~]# sudo mv /var/lib/aide/aide.db.new.gz /var/lib/aide/aide.db.gz

5. Once the database has been renamed we can run the aide --check command to confirm the database is correct.

If all is ok you should get back the message below.

### All files match AIDE database. Looks okay!

[hme@hme ~]# sudo aide --check

AIDE, version 0.15.1

### All files match AIDE database. Looks okay!

6. To check AIDE is checking your files and directories, we can create a file manually to see if it's detected.

Create a file with the touch and re-run the aide -- check command.

[hme@hme ~]# touch testfile

[hme@hme ~]# aide --check

AIDE 0.15.1 found differences between database and filesystem!!

Start timestamp: 2021-01-31 17:06:11

Summary:

  Total number of files: 88889

  Added files: 1

  Removed files: 0

  Changed files: 0

---------------------------------------------------

Added files:

---------------------------------------------------

added: /hme/testfile

7. As shown below AIDE has detected the new file. If the file is ok and is meant to be on the server you can run the command aide --update to add the files to the existing database or re-run the commands from section 3 above.

[hme@hme ~]# aide --update

AIDE 0.15.1 found differences between database and filesystem!!

Start timestamp: 2021-01-31 17:18:04

Summary:

  Total number of files: 88889

  Added files: 1

  Removed files: 0

  Changed files: 0

---------------------------------------------------

Added files:

---------------------------------------------------

added: /hme/testfile

8. Its good practice to always keep the old AIDE database and rename the updated database on a daily bases incase you need to look at the changes from the past.

[hme@hme ~]# cd /var/lib/aide/

[hme@hme aide]# ls

aide.db.gz  aide.db.new.gz

[hme@hme aide]# mv aide.db.gz aide.db.gz-Jan312021

[hme@hme aide]# mv aide.db.new.gz aide.db.gz

[hme@hme aide]# ls

aide.db.gz  aide.db.gz-Jan312021

[hme@hme aide]# 

9. Some files will be constantly changing, log files for example, for this we can add exceptions to the AIDE config file so they are ignored.

Open the AIDE conf file nano /etc/aide.conf and add the path to the files you would like AIDE to ignore.

[hme@hme ~]# nano /etc/aide.conf 

!/var/log/.*     # ignore the log dir it changes too often

10. We can automate the process with cron to run aide --check and save to a file, then use mailx to send us the file every hour, day, week etc. what ever period of time that suits our needs.

0 */12 * * * /usr/sbin/aide --check > /var/log/aide/SystemFileCheck.log

11. We can also check the AIDE log files less /var/log/aide/aide.log

[hme@hme aide]# less /var/log/aide/aide.log

AIDE 0.15.1 found differences between database and filesystem!!

Start timestamp: 2021-01-31 17:20:13

Summary:

  Total number of files:        88889

  Added files:                  1

  Removed files:                0

  Changed files:                0

---------------------------------------------------

Added files:

---------------------------------------------------

added: /root/testfile

/var/log/aide/aide.log (END)

And that's the basics of getting the AIDE (Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment)up and running on your CentOS 7 server. 

AIDE website: https://aide.github.io

AIDE GitHub: https://github.com/aide/aide

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